Teacher Leadership · Writing Workshop

My Writing Journey

A few weeks ago, Lori, Kris, and I shared about our blog, our writing group, and ourselves as writers.  As we stood in front of these Juniors and Seniors who were about to begin blogging as part of their Physics class, I felt very proud. We were asked to talk to young writers about writing because we are writers. Throughout my life I have worn this label proudly, it has faded into the background and almost disappeared entirely, and recently has surfaced with new enthusiasm.

My journey as a writer has been a bumpy one:

  • As a child, I was a journaler. It makes me laugh when I think of those notes full of friendship woes and puppy love crushes.
  • Through high school and college, I was a procrastinator who spent many a late night/early morning cranking out a paper to be turned in a mere two to three hours later.
  • As a young teacher, my writing life was non-existent.
  • As a soon-to-be Mom, I wrote letters to Brody sharing my excitement, hopes, and dreams for him. (I have added to letter to this journal on each of Brody’s birthdays.)
  • After discovering the work of Lucy Calkins and The Reading Writing Project, I began writing what I asked my students to write.  (This was very eye-opening and a wonderful reminder that writing is difficult.)
  • In pursuit of my EdD, I slipped back into old habits from high school and college and quickly learned that these habits do not produce writing I am proud of.
    And today, I try to write at least three times per week. Some of this writing holds the seeds of blog posts, some of this writing helps me celebrate the wonderful business of our lives, and some of this writing will never be seen by anyone but helps me think.

As I think about this writing journey, there are three things that I know are most important to my writing process:

  1. A clear audience. Is the writing only for me or will I share with a larger audience? When the writing is only for me, I freely share all of my opinions and include the brutal honesty that will help me truly reflect. When the writing is something that I think could be shared, I am more careful with my words, I write in a more concise manner and I think about details I can share that will engage the reader.
  2. A topic I care about. It is almost impossible for me to write about something that I do not care about. Writing is hard – I have to be 100% invested to put forth the effort!
  3. Feedback from others. The encouraging words from others about my writing are fueling me and I am so grateful. I LOVE when someone mentions our blog and wants to talk about one of the posts. I LOVE when someone shares that something I wrote and posted on the blog has caused them to think. I LOVE when my writing group praises me for the writing habit I am working to develop.

As I reflected on my personal writing process I started thinking about all classrooms where young writers are asked to think.

  • I wonder what our young writers would recognize as the essential elements to their writing process. Do our classrooms allow for these essential elements?
  • I wonder if our young writers feel ownership of their writing process. How can we help them develop this?
  • I wonder if our young writers would describe themselves as writers. How can we help them build this identity?
ASSESSMENT · blogging · Community · Leading · Literacy · Students · Teacher Leadership · Uncategorized

Raising Voices in Secondary Classrooms

I had five minutes to inspire ELA teachers at Dublin’s Literacy Conference. This is what I said:

I co-teach 9th-grade inclusion English I at Dublin Coffman High School, and I’ve been to NCTE twice now.

There’s a LOT to love about NCTE. 

NCTE’s theme this year in Houston was “Raising Student Voice,” but what I’ve come to learn about the conference in the two years I’ve attended is that the learning transcends so much more than the year’s theme.

I got to attend the First Timer’s Breakfast this year as a table host, which was super exciting. I got to see Donalyn Miller and Ernest Morrell speak.

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The way Donalyn opened her speech will stick with me forever. She said, “Look around you. This is where you need to be. This is your family. This is your home.”

And she went on to talk about the importance of surrounding yourself with others who are proactive in seeking out their own learning. Her wisdom can undoubtedly apply to today. I always consider Dublin’s Lit Conference to be a mini-NCTE. Look around. We may not know each other, but we are all related because we share common hopes and dreams for our students. So, to me, days like today are as much about professional development as they are about networking.

Donalyn also said this: “Kids need champions, but teachers do, too.”  Ain’t that the truth. We’ve all heard the statistics of teacher retention rates. And I’ll be honest here. Every year, as NCTE and as Dublin’s Literacy Conference approach, I start to hesitate. NCTE is RIGHT before Thanksgiving. I find myself asking do I have time for this? Shouldn’t I be home with my family preparing for the holidays? I’m tired, and I’m busy, and I’m wearing 100 hats, and I don’t feel good… Why do I keep signing myself up to go to these things? And then I go (because I already signed myself up for it), and get this: I NEVER regret it.

I never regret attending NCTE or DLC because of (1) the networking and (2) all the reminders as to why we became English teachers in the first place (like how to raise students’ voice). I don’t know about you, but when I don’t attend or participate in PD, I start to lose focus on what’s really at the heart of my job.

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So, I keep attending these conferences and surrounding myself with the people who also do because these people push me and praise me and help me find and reach my “true north.” This is a term that Kate Roberts used at NCTE. I figured out a few years ago that my “true north” when it comes to reading instruction is choice, and that has been the focus of much of my professional development over the last few years. I decided that in order to be a truly skilled teacher of reading, I better be a reader. I started reading YA books with my students, I worked on perfecting the art of the book talking, and I do all this because I strive to provide choice to insure success for all of my students.

This year, though, I’ve decided to put more focus on my writing instruction, and call me crazy, but I’ve decided that in order to be a truly talented teacher of writing, I need to be a writer.

Falling back in love with reading and identifying as a reader was easy for me. This new journey? Not so much. I’ve never in my life called myself a writer, and I don’t know how long it will take me to identify as one, but I’m trying.

A big part of this journey is a switch that I’ve made in my mind frame.

I used to teach writing with this in mind: “Be an encourager. The world has enough critics already.” I always try to praise a few specific parts of students’ work before providing one or two pointed bits of criticism to show room for improvement.

Then I saw this:

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It stopped me in my tracks. I’m always the critic. I’m always either reading and analyzing student work or reading and analyzing literature, and let’s be honest, it’s a LOT easier to be the giver of criticism than the receiver.

So, if I haven’t made it clear by now: I’m currently mustering the courage to build a writing identity.

A group of educators for Dublin City Schools has taken on this journey together. We’ve started an educational blog, we meet in person monthly, and we try to post weekly.

Screen Shot 2019-03-02 at 5.57.49 AMFor many of us, this is truly scary work for countless reasons. First and foremost, as someone at NCTE said, “Teachers, on a daily basis, are reminded of their failures.”  It isn’t often that we are reminded of our successes. So, it’s scary to write about the happenings of our classrooms in a public forum that is open to criticism.

Someone else at NCTE said, “Every student has a story. The most dangerous presumption is that they don’t want their voices heard.”

Now that I’ve started to write beside my students, I’m coming to learn that every teacher has a story, too, and the world needs teachers’ voices. I read this on teachthought a few days ago:

“In the next version of the Every Student Succeeds Act, the federal legislation that guides education policy in this country, the words accountability and assessment are mentioned in some capacity at least 250 times each.

The words teaching and learning? 22 times.

Combined.”

This is scary stuff because we all know words have power. I want you to ask yourself this today:

Who is currently writing the story of what happens inside your classroom? Whose voice is loudest?

In these ways, I’m learning how to raise student voice while simultaneously learning how to raise mine:

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And these are just to name a few. As I continue this journey to becoming a writer, I will share more on how my teaching of writing improves.

If you had five minutes in front of a room of ELA educators, what would you say?

Community · Literacy · Reading · Reflection · Teacher Leadership · Teaching

Three Things from #DubLit19

As others on this blog have posted, the Dublin Literacy Conference is always a day in which I feel renewed and reinvigorated in my teaching. I learn so much from the presenters, the featured authors, and my colleagues with whom I debrief throughout the day. I also have the added bonus of being part of the conference committee, so I feel a sense of pride when I hear people sharing their happy stories about the day. It takes a lot of love, effort, and teamwork to get the conference organized through months of planning, and I feel so honored to be a part of it.

This year, three things really stuck out to me as I think back to my time at the Dublin Literacy Conference on Saturday.

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The Students!

We always receive feedback on how much people love seeing our students’ presence within the conference. They perform our opening ceremony, introduce the authors, show off their tech skills at our Tech Tables, and guide attendees throughout the day. Students of all grade levels are visible, and it is so rewarding to see how excited they are when asked to be a part of the day. This year, our opening ceremony included Six-Word Memoirs from students of each grade level, and it could not have better exemplified our theme: “30 Years: Celebrating Our Stories.” Even our little kindergartener used her “big voice” (as encouraged by my colleague, Lauren) to share her story. There were laughs and awws, and I could tell that the audience loved hearing each of these kids speak to their truth.

I also love seeing the students introduce the authors — and the authors love it too! One of my students introduced Jason Reynolds, and through some of my own miscalculation, I told her to get there over an hour early. She was a trooper though, and sat through Jason’s first presentation with me even when she didn’t have to. When she introduced him, she talked about how he got his start as a poet and he was so appreciative that he referenced back to her words later in his talk. It’s wonderful to see students interacting with authors they admire!

The Authors!

I spent the majority of my day with Jason Reynolds as his author host, which was an incredible experience. Before picking him up with my hosting partner, Rita, I wasn’t sure what we would talk about it. He turned out to be one of the most gracious, laid-back, and thoughtful authors I’ve met in my time working on this conference. I could see how much he cared for his readers, for students, and for teachers who shared his books with eager (and not so eager!) readers. His message during his keynote and later session focused so much on seeing the whole child, while also helping students to know that we see and accept them for who they are.

Another benefit of being on the committee is getting to go to an “author dinner” after the conference. On Saturday, I was lucky enough to be seated next to Hena Khan as we all settled in for dinner. We had such an engaging discussion about books and students, and she was so lovely in all of her responses — I was sad when it was finally time to go!

Getting to make these connections helps me feel even more passionate about getting books into my students’ hands. I see how thoughtful these authors are, and how their books can help students in more ways than I can. But I can help them get there, if I share my love for these books as well.

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The Quality Conversations!

I signed up to present at the conference this year as well, and I was so inspired by the conversations that sprung from my session. My presentation focused on how to have students reflect on their own identities, and how I’ve used Sara K. Ahmed’s book Being the Change as my guide. I only had about 10 people in my session, but the small group ended up being the perfect environment for a rich discussion. Other teachers shared their experiences and plans they had already thought about for incorporating this work into their classrooms. It really gave me a boost to have this dialogue and to continue to rethink the students I teach in my classes.

 

Even with just this small snapshot of the day, I know how powerful these moments are and will stick with me as I head back into my classroom. Overall, I came away from the Dublin Literacy Conference feeling renewed and validated in so many ways. I felt like I was buzzing with excited energy for the entire day — this conference is something I care so much about. I can’t wait to do it all again next year!

 

Goal Setting · Leading · Teacher Leadership

Expert … or Specialist?

This fall Beth and I spent a Saturday learning with Kristin Ziemke. Our district is in the process of becoming one-to-one in grades six through twelve and I have been thinking a lot about what blended learning looks in the HS ELA reading and writing workshop. When we noticed that the Literacy Connection was bringing Kristin to the area we decided to join, even though the workshop was marketed for K-6 teachers (another post coming soon related to this).

While I learned so much about purposeful leveraging of technology from Kristin (hopefully yet another post will be coming), what I have been thinking most about is this idea of expert or specialist and her description of these two terms. Kristin described an expert as “someone who knows it all” and a specialist as “someone who believes the learning is never done but wants to know all they can.” What a difference in mindset!

I want others to think of me as a specialist, but do I present as an expert? And if I do present as expert how does that impact others’ abilities to learn? I am writing as a literary coach, so I am thinking about adult learners, but I also think this applies to the learning that happens in our classrooms. If a teacher sees herself as a specialist and not as an expert how does this impact student learning?

Some things I will commit to to ensure that I remain a specialist:

  • Read a wide variety of research about literacy, especially HS literacy
  • Question this reading and align it to my core beliefs about learning
  • Listen to others with a truly open-mind
  • Consistently share my new learning
  • Talk about failure
  • Be flexible
  • Look for the happiness and joy in literacy learning
  • Value the questions of others
Leading · Teacher Leadership

Finding a New Place

Screen Shot 2019-01-18 at 10.04.46 AM.png“Is it my turn?!?”

“I haven’t been the ‘lucky duck’ yet…can it be me?”

“Who is the ‘lucky duck’ today? Who gets to sit in the chair?” That’s what I heard as I entered a sixth-grade language arts classroom this week.

I wondered what all the excitement was about when I glanced over and saw this pea green rocking chair sitting next to the #classroombookaday reading area. I smiled. It was my green, creaky, repaired-many-times rocking chair that had been a fixture in my classroom for the past 19 years.

Apparently the ‘lucky duck’ each day got the privilege to sit in the rocking chair during the picture book read aloud. The students were so excited to have the special seat, and I was so excited to see my rocking chair in use and being loved by students as it had been for almost two decades. The chair had found a new space in a different classroom – just like me.

As I mentioned in a previous post, I chose to leave the classroom this year to take on the role of a literacy coach for the four middle schools in my school district. It has been almost three months and I am still finding my groove and my place. But, I have been embraced – just like the rocking chair – by teachers in all four schools.

Taking on a new role was something that I challenged myself to do. I’m not a person who typically embraces change so there have been good days and not-so-good days. I’ve been reflecting on a daily basis about “finding my new place” so that’s a little of what I’m sharing.

There are definite things that I hadn’t thought of before moving to a new place(s):

  • Parking – some people are particular about their parking spot
  • Lunch – do most teachers eat in the teachers’ lounge? Am I taking someone’s spot OR limiting the conversations because of the ‘new’ person in the room?
  • A tribe – I sort of lost my tribe because I’m not at my former school every day. I’m only there every six weeks.
  • Keys/office space – so many keys and such different spaces
  • My back – lugging bags of professional books from building to building is fun:)
  • Momentum – two weeks is just enough time to start building momentum with teachers and students but then my coaching cycle is over and the momentum is lost/deferred

I am certainly not complaining. I really enjoy working with teachers. It is different than working with teenagers – it’s a good different. The amazing work that the teachers in the middle schools are doing every day make me proud and make me push my own thinking. What and how can I support teachers who are knowledgeable about the learners sitting in their classrooms and are thinking about how to best keep those learners reading and writing every day?

I’m thinking in a different way this year and I’m finding my way in this new role.  I feel like I’m the ‘lucky duck’ who is getting to know colleagues that I didn’t know and spending time with students in all three grade levels that I normally wouldn’t get to. I’m excited to wake up and go to work each day, and I’m challenged by the thinking and reflecting that I do with teachers. My new place is working out really well – just like the new place for that 50-year-old, much-loved rocking chair.

 

Community · Culture · Teacher Leadership

Better Because of My Champions

 

People who will nourish you and help you love this crazy complicated, exhilarating pursuit.
Happy to be at school every day!

These two statements have appeared in my recent reading and they have prompted me to stop and think … I LOVE this very important work that we as educators do every day. I love the relationships I develop with the amazing young people who enter our schools every day. But I am reminded that we must NEVER discount the relationships we build with the adults who are on this journey with us.

I am better (a better educator and more importantly a better person) because of these amazing, kind, curious people. These people have taught me to:

  1. Listen without judgement. This is hard! I have very strong opinions about what good instruction is, about how we should talk to and about learners, about our ultimate mission as educators… Those in “my balcony” help me recognize that these beliefs define my core, but can sometimes cause a bias that I have to work very hard to put aside in order for me to truly hear.
  2. Be honest and humble. I am extremely lucky and my tribe is full of absolute rock stars! My thinking is pushed through conversation with these colleagues and I learn from them all of the time. But each of these rock stars is reflective and a true learner who wants to get better every day. They have shown me the true meaning of humility.
  3. Lead by example. Whether leading a building, a school district, a classroom or a learning activity my people lead with grace and kindness. From them I have learned that people always come first!
  4. Embrace new opportunity. Wow! I think this is the most important thing I have learned and the thing I am most grateful for. The educators around me have encouraged me to try new things (ie. paddleboard yoga) and share my learning with a wider audience than I would have ever thought possible (ie. this blog). These opportunities have revealed parts of myself I didn’t know were there.
  5. Ask for help. No one has all of the answers and the sooner we realize this the better off we are and the more we can learn; being an educator (and life in general) is hard … knowing there are people willing to help is a true blessing.
  6. Question. It is not good to be surrounded by people who always agree with you. They either are not being honest, or you are missing out on important ideas and new learning. My chamopins are always willing to ask the hard questions and to push back on my crazy ideas. Who knows what I would have stepped in without their “have you thought about this” conversations.
  7. Honor and celebrate. We celebrate the successes of others and honor the slip-ups that happen as opportunities for growth. This has forever changed my mindset and made be a better person!
  8. Breathe and enjoy the ride. In my younger years I was a bit, let’s say, high strung. I hate to admit, but I often engaged in complaining and wallowing in frustrations. This absolutely was not helpful or productive. My champions help me to take a breathe, remember it isn’t always going to be perfect, and remind me to enjoy the messiness of learning and growing.
  9. Be patient. Anything worth having takes time (and may not follow the timeline you developed in your head). The “when” is very important!
  10. Never lose sight of the goal. This past spring was very hard for me – I have never heard “no” so many times in my professional life. But each of these nos was followed by words of encouragement and reminders to never give up, to always do my best and to never stop advocating for the best possible educational system. Exactly what I needed to hear!

Who are your champions? As we start this new school year I challenge you to let them know how much they matter and how grateful you are for them.

 

Leading · Teacher Leadership

To change or not to change…

Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek. – Barack Obama

The past few months have brought about a lot of change in my life. I’ve gotten through almost 48 years with not a lot of that. I think I could safely say (before April) that I was not a person who embraced change. Oh, every once in a while I change my hair color or I try a new radio station…but I couldn’t be characterized as a mover or a shaker. I’ve branched out to become a yoga teacher, but other than that, I taught at the same school for 19 years, been married to the same wonderful guy for 22 years, typically vacationed in the same three places, and have the layout of my Kroger burned into my memory.

Personally, my life is about to change as my older daughter heads off to college this fall. This spring brought a lot of “lasts” – last spring break as a whole family, last prom, last time walking through the doors of her school, and last hug as a high school student. I feel like I’ve handled these changes well – probably because my daughter is ready.  But still I’ve wondered what it will be like when she leaves. Will she miss us? Will college be everything that she wants and dreams of? Will this change be a positive one for her? I’ve tried to remain relatively calm as these “lasts” happened and as our lives as a family of four change.

Professionally, I am making a big change as well. I’ve packed all of my belongings from the school where I taught for 19 years. I’m embarking on a new path that will take me out of my classroom and into the classrooms of other language arts teachers across the district as a literacy coach.

If you would have told me that I would be on this path four months ago, I would have told you that you were crazy. I had a great gig teaching 8th grade language arts with three people that I enjoyed working with and had a fantastic professional learning partnership with. My classroom was a place that I was proud of and had worked hard to make into a positive learning environment. My principal is an enviable instructional leader that I was so happy to work for and with. One colleague said I was crazy to leave and that he didn’t understand what was going through my mind – my school is an idyllic teaching situation.

So why did I decide to make the change? I don’t think it was peer pressure. I don’t think it was flattery, I don’t think it was “I’m going to prove to people that I can change” (ok, maybe a little bit of this if we’re talking about my husband).

At some point, after making lists of positives and negatives and after sitting in silent reflection for long periods of time, I decided that it was time for me to try something new. I love working with teenagers, but I also love working with adults. I would visit other classrooms once a week if I were allowed. There are so many smart, reflective teachers around the district that I will get to learn from every day. Hopefully, I will be able to impact more than the 120 students I saw on a daily basis last year. My professional learning and personal reading will be different which is exciting and challenging. Finally, my daughters both were cheerleaders for this position and told me that this is what I’m supposed to be doing and to go for it.

Making the decision to change my career path for a few years felt like a weight was lifted from my shoulders once I accepted the job. Up until I said “yes”, I felt unsure but all the second-guessing was gone when I made the call. Honestly, it wasn’t what I thought I was going to do, and I rebelled against the idea for some time. However, I am ready to move forward and see what the next school year brings for me and for my family.

 

**I wrote this piece during the #SWI18 in June while surrounded by other Dublin teachers. I’ve started my journey as a coach now and I’m sure will share more about that soon.

 

Leading · Literacy · Reflection · Teacher Leadership

Staying Calm: The Dublin Literacy Conference

Friday, February 23

The day was almost here! This year, I was the Chairperson for the Dublin Literacy Conference. We had been working toward this day for months, and today was the day that I would really dig in with my co-chair, Marisa, and get all of the final details worked out. We met for breakfast and discussed what we needed to do for the day – we would get the participant packets organized and she would pick up two of our authors – Kate Roberts and Chris Barton – that afternoon when their flights got in.

Or so we thought.

Later that afternoon, as we were chipping away at the participant packets, we received notice that Kate Roberts’ flight was delayed. Okay, we thought, maybe she’ll still make her connecting flight. No big deal.

Then Chris Barton’s flight was delayed. We weren’t panicking just yet, but we were a little more on edge. He got on another flight set to land around 7 p.m. in Columbus, so we breathed a little more easily. He would miss our author dinner, but would make it for Saturday’s conference.

Soon after that, we learned that even with the delay, Kate made her connecting flight, and was on time for her arrival in Columbus. Marisa left to pick her up, and I kept working.

After another hour or so, I was finished with the preparations for the conference the next day, and I went home. On my drive, I debated whether or not I should go for a run, since I had about and hour and a half before I needed to leave for dinner.

As soon as I got home, however, everything changed. It turned out Kate was getting over the flu, so she wasn’t going to join us for dinner so she could rest up. Then I needed to head to the hotel where the authors were staying to give them some missing paperwork. With no authors planning to attend the dinner, we decided to cancel. I called our accommodations committee member, Aleia,  and set that plan in motion.

But wait! Chris Barton was going to make it by 6 p.m., so he could attend the dinner. I had to quickly call and reverse my previous request – the dinner was back on.

After that chaotic hour (needless to say, I didn’t get that run in), I headed out to dinner a little early to make sure everything was set with the restaurant. Our committee members started arriving, one of our presenters, Olivia Van Ledtje (@theLivBits), and her mother also joined us for this dinner. Marisa had picked up Chris from the airport, and they made it to the restaurant. Everything was running smoothly now.

…until we learned that George Couros’s first flight from Vancouver had been sitting on the runway for over an hour, waiting to be de-iced. We knew the weather wasn’t the best in parts of the United States, but we hadn’t accounted for snow storms in western Canada. George wasn’t going to make his connecting flight in Minneapolis, and couldn’t get out of there until the morning. This didn’t work for us, seeing as he was supposed to start his keynote the next morning around 8:45. We needed a new plan.

Could we Skype him in? Could he fly to another city a couple of hours away and someone could go pick him up? Could we switch our morning and afternoon keynotes? Linda Sue Park’s flight had been delayed, but she was still scheduled to arrive that evening. This seemed like our best option.

One of our committee members called Linda Sue at dinner that night, and she graciously accepted this change of schedule. Granting now that all flights arrived on time from here on out, we would be in good shape.

 

Saturday, February 24

As people arrived the next morning, we simply told them that the morning and afternoon keynotes had been switched, and no one even seemed to mind. Everyone was still going to get what they were promised, just in a different order. The committee kept joking that this whole process felt like a wedding – we would deal with mayhem behind the scenes, and our guests would be none the wiser.

And after all of that chaos, with all of our flexibility, the day went off without any other issues. Linda Sue gave a beautiful keynote in the morning, which inspired educators as they went off for a day of learning. George made it in time for his keynote and spent some time autographing through his scheduled lunch. Everyone was thrilled that they were able to experience so much, and learn from our authors and other presenters there. As a committee, we felt so grateful that our featured authors were incredibly flexible and enthusiastic throughout the day.

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Since the Dublin Literacy Conference a month ago, all I have heard was positive feedback. Everybody loved the day – the keynotes, the featured authors, the teacher presentations – everything learned was valuable and participants felt like they could use the skills and knowledge they learned in their classrooms the next day.

As for me, I learned a lot about staying calm under pressure and relying on a team to help out in any given situation. Though I was the Chairperson for the day, I could not have done anything without my amazing conference committee. They took care of details I didn’t even notice, and they helped keep me grounded when things seemed to be spiraling out of control. I am so proud of the work we did for that day because it seems have had such a positive impact on everyone who was there.

I can’t wait to do it all again next year!

Teacher Leadership

Mentors In All Shapes and Sizes

Year 32. And I have so much to learn.

The start of every school year evokes a variety of emotions in me.  I am excited to meet the students new to our school. I am enthusiastic about implementing new initiatives the summer gave me time to develop.  I am apprehensive about how teachers will receive our professional development plan.  I am energized by the physical and mental break June and July provided.

Even with this roller coaster of emotions, the positive energy I feel far surpasses any unease I might experience. This isn’t entirely my own doing.  It is a direct result of the professionals I surround myself with.  And, these important people are not simply colleagues.  They are my mentors. They come with varying experience, teach different ages of children, and have expertise in a variety of content areas.  Each is essential to my success and to my ability to stay focused on what matters most to me…providing instructional leadership so that every student in our school finds success.

You may be surprised that I have more than one mentor. By definition, a mentor acts as a trusted advisor, and if teaching and leading were single faceted, one mentor might be enough.  However, teaching and leading are complex and to be successful, we need many trusted advisors- all with different strengths. On any given day, I might tap into the expertise of 5 or 6 mentors.  Jill mentors me in my work as a whole group facilitator.  I seek Mike’s expertise when I am thinking about building culture. Lisa is my mental health accountability partner. Brock is my inspiration on Twitter.  I need each of them- and several others- to help me stay balanced and to stay reflective- so I grow. So I continue to learn.

As I begin our new school year, I make the time to recognize my strengths- areas in which I could serve as mentor to others- and my weaknesses, areas in which I can grow.  In both cases, I am purposeful about finding time to connect with those who have similar interests and could perhaps serve as my mentor or those who I could buoy professionally.  I encourage you to do the same.  Challenge yourself to create a list of colleagues you consider mentors and ask yourself how those individuals support you in your work. Tell them how important they are to you.  Your relationships will flourish.

When you’re assessing your strengths and weaknesses as part of your new year goal setting, consider identifying someone who either shares similar goals- and you could learn together- or identify an expert in your school, district or social media circle.   Fight the voice in your head that tells you this person won’t want or doesn’t have time to chat about their expertise. Reach out and share your ideas.  Ask your questions.  Find colleagues who will stimulate thinking.  Invite them into your conversations.  You will be amazed and pleased how these simple steps change your work and most importantly impact your students’ thinking and learning.

Whether a rookie or a seasoned veteran, we still have a lot to learn.