Reading

Packing Up and Moving Out

The middle of February and March brings new opportunities to teachers around the country (or at least in my school district). In fact today we received an email with voluntary transfer information in it. There may be teachers who are contemplating a change to a new grade level or a new subject or a new school or a new district. I decided to share this post about leaving the classroom even though I originally labeled it as “probably won’t post”. Maybe it will make someone feel better as possible opportunities appear on the horizon.

This spring I decided to take a job as a middle school literacy coach in my school district. It was a tough choice and one I’ve written about previously. One of the things that wasn’t a blip on my radar as I was making the decision was the thought that I’d have to pack up my classroom and classroom library for a few years. Forgot about that😆

There are several things I’ve learned from packing up to leave a classroom:

I have a serious addiction to Amazon. Luckily, I have a husband who doesn’t complain about the amount of money I spend on my classroom or my classroom library. Screen Shot 2019-03-13 at 6.57.31 PM.pngI am active on social media and keep up with the publication of books on a regular basis, so I’ve tried hard to pay Jeff Bezos’s salary for the past ten years. I believe I packed 16 boxes of books that the Honeycutts have paid for. I’m pretty sure I left quite a few on the shelves that we bought too, but I want the new teacher to have a nice library for the start of school.

I am not a good purger…I’m not quite a hoarder either, but it’s close. How many overhead transparencies are too much to have in a filing cabinet in 2018? I think I probably found at least 50, along with lesson plans, copies, packets, and student work samples. I had discs with student projects about Greek gods and goddesses from 12 years ago. I attended one of the student’s weddings last summer and know that another one has a baby on the way. Too long since I’d gone through the filing cabinet? Probably. (Do people still use filing cabinets anyway? Thank goodness I got rid of my teacher desk years ago – heaven knows what might have been in there.)

Decisions as to what to keep and what to pitch are tough for me. I guess this goes back to the last bullet, except as I went through my closet, I was thinking about Sarah, the fantastic person taking my job, and what she might need. File folders? Paper clips? Construction paper? Magnets? Bulletin board letters or borders? I left most of it. I can’t carry it from school to school. I tried to err on the side of practicality as I went through the cabinets. I also gave Sarah full permission to toss anything that she didn’t think she’d want. I told her to not ask – just do it!

Leaving a school where you’ve been for 19 years is hard! The last few days of school were rough for me. I was an emotional mess due to leaving colleagues and friends that I respect so much (and my older daughter was graduating from high school which added another layer to my mess). I had several breakdowns and moments of panic as I walked through the halls. I’m ok now – I just remind myself that I didn’t move to the other side of the country and that I’ll be back every six weeks.

My family is fantastic! My lovely daughters and my ever-patient husband helped me make the decision to leave the classroom, so of course, I enlisted their help to move my stuff out. Thank goodness they are all fit people who like to lift heavy things. The boxes have moved from my old classroom to the backs of a car/truck and to the garage. Hopefully, by the time you read this, the boxes will be safely stowed in the basement.

Besides being a cathartic, reflective writing for me, I’d like to say that this could serve as advice for the reader; however, my advice isn’t to never buy books or to throw out everything from years past. My suggestions are to do anything you can to make your classroom what you want it to be – if that means buying books then buy books. If you save student work, then maybe someday you can hand it to the parent or to the sibling of the student as a keepsake/reminder of the time in your class. If it means to shed a few (or many) tears while leaving a building or hugging a colleague, then do that. Allowing all the emotions to flow is important. If it means to remind you of the important people in your life and how they support you, then that’s great. Don’t be afraid to take a new journey or to leave a comfortable place behind.

 

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